PHOENIX -- With his back healthy, Brett Morel is anxious to rebound from his disappointing 2012 season. The hopeful White Sox third baseman is willing to do anything to show his worth to the club.

Including play shortstop.

Morel, last season's Opening Day third baseman, appeared at shortstop in Thursday's 4-3 loss to the Brewers at Maryvale Baseball Park. He made no plays after entering in the bottom of the fifth, with the only ball hit his way a grounder up the middle he dove for but came up empty.

Manager Robin Ventura said the club decided to give Morel the chance to move around the infield, something the 25-year-old said he's open to.

"Like I said when I first got here, my goal is to play third base every day. I think that kind of has to be your mindset," Morel said. "And if they want me to play other positions, and that's going to get me to break camp and on that 25-man roster, then I'll do anything."

Thursday wasn't necessarily a foreign voyage for Morel. He said he played shortstop growing up in high school, college and even appeared in 17 games there with Triple-A Charlotte in 2010. He said he took a few ground balls at the position during batting practice prior to the game, but was confident in his defensive ability, noting the main thing he worked on was turning double plays.

Ventura said he's optimistic Morel can field the position well, and is glad to give him the chance.

"Give him some opportunities out there. We went to him and he's done it before in the past," Ventura said. "With all the guys competing for jobs, it's good to be able to have a little versatility like that."

Despite mistake, prospect Snodgress impresses

PHOENIX -- Only one mistake soured Scott Snodgress' first Cactus League start Thursday. Other than that, the left-handed prospect was on target.

Snodgress -- the club's No. 6 prospect, according to MLB.com -- surrendered a second-inning, two-run homer to Milwaukee's Khris Davis in what was otherwise an impressive three-inning start in Chicago's 4-3 loss to the Brewers at Maryvale Baseball Park.

"I felt like it was a solid outing," said Snodgress, who allowed two hits, struck out one and walked one. "I felt I made one mistake with my curve and, other than that, I feel very good about the way I executed."

Thursday's outing was Snodgress' second of the spring, the other a scoreless inning of relief against the Dodgers on Sunday. The 23-year-old was a former collegiate reliever at Stanford, but has been groomed as a starter since the White Sox selected him in the fifth-round of the 2011 First-Year Player Draft. He said was happy to return to the routine of starting.

Snodgress led the White Sox Minor League qualifiers in batting average against (.217) and strikeouts (128) last season, while also finishing second in ERA (3.00). That performance at Class A Kannapolis and High A Winston-Salem earned Snodgress an invite to Major League Spring Training, an experience he's enjoyed thus far.

"It's been an awesome experience, really a dream come true," Snodgress said. "I've had a lot of fun, I've learned a lot. And it's a good place to be. A lot of guys to talk to. A lot of guys you can pick their brains and learn a lot from. It's been awesome experience."

Worth noting

• The plays of the day in Thursday's contest came in right field. Keenyn Walker, the White Sox No. 8 prospect, according to MLB.com, ended the fourth inning by throwing Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy out at home. Milwaukee right fielder Josh Prince also made two nice running catches in the fourth and fifth innings.

At the plate, Walker went 1-for-3 and scored two runs, upping his spring average to .333 (4-for-12).

"He's looked great," White Sox manager Robin Ventura said about Walker. "From last year to this year, it's a good improvement that you see guys get better and just mature and kind of grow in the system."

• Outfielder Jordan Danks, who has been inactive because of discomfort in his right elbow, pinch-hit Thursday but didn't play the field.

• Josh Bell launched a ninth-inning home run to right field that flew over the fence 364 feet away and nearly landed on the sidewalk atop the berm at Maryvale Baseball Park.